A good website loads fast, boasts a beautiful design, is search engine friendly and offers a brilliant user experience design. In fact, having a website with a poor design could make users feel like your brand is of poor quality or untrustworthy.

*record scratch*

But if you peel off that top layer of design elements – what is a user experience, really? 

Nielsen Norman Group probably says it best that “user experience encompasses all aspects of the end-user’s interaction with the company, its services, and its products.”

All your design efforts will come up short if your website, or app, is not supporting your users’ goals. To most business owners, these goals are so fundamental that they risk being forgotten when you’re focused on all aspects of your business. With user-generated content platforms such as dating apps, marketplaces, video streaming, etc., you’re essentially handing over a massive chunk of your user experience to your community.

Consider this: You are interested in buying a bike, so you hop on your favorite marketplace app and search for bikes. The search result shows hundreds of postings near you. Great! The only thing is; first, you must wade through 4 pages of inappropriate images, scams, and harassment.

Two apps showing content with and without content moderation
Moderated content is a big part of creating a great user experience

To quote Donald Miller, “a caveman should be able to glance at it and immediately grunt back what you offer.” This is referred to as the Grunt Test; it’s a real thing.

Many marketing reports show poor design decisions are culprits why customers may leave your site. That’s a given. One report says that 88% of online consumers are unlikely to return to a website after a poor experience.

With user-generated content platforms you’re essentially handing over a massive chunk of your user experience to your community.

Most likely are those numbers closer to 99% should we remove content moderation from the user experience equation.

The User Experience Honeycomb

At the core of UX is ensuring that users find value in what you provide. Peter Morville presents this magnificent through his User Experience Honeycomb. 

The user experience honeycomb as presented by semanticstudios.com

One of the 7 facets of his honeycomb is “credible,” as Morville notes that for there to be a meaningful and valuable user experience, information must be:

Credible: Users must trust and believe what you tell them.

So what if your information and content are user-generated? Then you aren’t the one providing the credibility.

User Experience in user-generated content

We would argue that Credible (or Trust) serves best as the base for your user experience when it comes to user-generated content apps and websites. After all, the user experience is more than just something intuitive to use.

When User Experience Fails Despite Good Design

Few things will hurt your users’ confidence in your app faster than harassment or irrelevant content. In-game chats and, to some extent, dating apps are breeding grounds for trolling. Flame wars can create an unfriendly online environment, making other users feel compelled to respond to abusers or leave your platform entirely. 

Harassment still happens, and no one is immune, despite your platform’s fantastic design.

The emphasis on trust and credibility can not be overstated when your platform relies on user-generated content.

Online reviews and comments from social media are the new word-of-mouth advertisement. With a growing pool of information available online to more consumers, this form of content could either become an effective branding tool or the undoing of branding. Even if the content does not appeal to children, they may still flag it on the site or tell an adult they trust.

Trust user reviews, images, and videos

Suppose handing over a big part of your customers’ user experience to largely unknown users feels like a scary ordeal. In that case, you’re in for a rollercoaster regarding reviews.

Fake online reviews are more prevalent than you might think and could lead you to purchase a product you would not have otherwise. Fake customer reviews are usually glowing, even over-the-top, reading more like infomercials than reviews. One MIT study found that fake reviews typically contained more exclamation points than genuine reviews. Fake reviewers believe that by adding these marks, they’ll emphasize the negative emotions behind their feedback. 

Conversely, it is not uncommon for sellers to purchase fake, one-star reviews to flood competitors’ pages.

According to research, 91% of people read online reviews regularly or occasionally, and 84% trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations.

Building trust into the user journey

Your online business aims to attract, retain, or engage users; creating an experience that turns them off is definitely not a smart step in this direction. It should be kept in mind that users should have an accessible and user-friendly experience when going on this journey with you. We even published a webinar about building trust into a user journey if you’re interested.

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Presentation: From 0% to 94% automation

Hear Jelena Moncilli, Anti-Fraud Specialist at Anibis.ch, share their journey to high moderation efficiency. Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • How to handle specific challenges facing online marketplaces.
  • Anibis’ journey to reach 94% automation.
  • Tangible results in moderation efficiency, when working with AI.
  • How Besedo has helped Anibis throughout this process.

This is Besedo

Global, full-service leader in content moderation

We provide automated and manual moderation for online marketplaces, online dating, sharing economy, gaming, communities and social media.

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presentation: I searched for T-shirt and it kept suggesting cars

Explore the results of our study on user search experience:

  • How to engage your users within the first 10 seconds.
  • How irrelevant content affects your users’ behavior.
  • The importance of accurate categorization.
  • Honest comments from marketplace users.

This is Besedo

Global, full-service leader in content moderation

We provide automated and manual moderation for online marketplaces, online dating, sharing economy, gaming, communities and social media.

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eBook: Keeping the Faith

How online marketplaces can build trust and loyalty

You will learn about:

  • Tools and techniques for more effective trust building
  • How to Build trust in the platform and the seller
  • The science of confidence and how to apply it

This is Besedo

Global, full-service leader in content moderation

We provide automated and manual moderation for online marketplaces, online dating, sharing economy, gaming, communities and social media.

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eBook: Why moderating content without censoring users demands consistent, transparent policies.

You will learn:
  • Why moderation and freedom of speech aren’t mutually exclusive
  • How content moderation can help you facilitate community growth
  • How you can implement moderation in a way that builds trust with your users

This is Besedo

Global, full-service leader in content moderation

We provide automated and manual moderation for online marketplaces, online dating, sharing economy, gaming, communities and social media.

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For many, online dating is now the default way to meet new people. As we become increasingly time-poor, digital devices act as a way for us to navigate our day-to-day lives and how we interact with others, including our relationships.

Despite attitudes towards dating apps becoming more positive and platforms gaining popularity in recent years, throughout their short history, they have attracted a great deal of attention on the risks they pose to users. While dating apps are an incredibly convenient way to maintain our love lives, they come with their own threats.

Risk vs risqué

Like any form of dating, connecting with strangers doesn’t come without risk. This is also the case when using an online dating platform. The exchange of information be it a phone number, address, or other personal details can be exploited if placed in the wrong hands. Dating scams, catfishing, and abuse attract headlines – and for platforms, advertising, misuse, and nudity also threaten to damage the user experience and brand reputation.

Finding the right balance between restricting content to protect users and allowing organic interactions to flourish is crucial to enabling platforms to grow and realize true potential. The power of online dating is its ability to make connections virtually, while the freedom which makes it possible to engage in negative interactions is also what makes it possible to have genuine, authentic, and meaningful relationships.

Growing a dating platform means harnessing the opportunities in the content it creates. Platforms cannot be seen to ‘scaremonger’ users, but it’s imperative they provide substantial safety features and guidelines to protect users and brand reputation, whilst using technology to enhance user experience and focus on retention to grow their platforms.

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Creating a safe space, without killing the mood

The recent context of lockdowns demonstrated the power of online dating; even without in-person interaction, it functioned as a place to make human connections. It works best, therefore, when it delivers the same surprise, joy, and meaningfulness of speaking to someone new in real life.

With online dating, it is tempting to see shutting down opportunities to interact as the only way to remove risk. But this isn’t what users want. They want to feel protected and trusting of the systems in place to be able to interact in confidence. It is now an expectation, not a “nice to have”, for platforms to filter out all harmful content from fake profiles to indecent imagery. Providing a sophisticated app to allow users to interact with who they choose is likely to result in increased brand loyalty as opposed to blocking all connections which could be deemed as harmful.

An engaging and reliable messaging experience is the foundation of retention on a successful dating platform. Creating a positive space to connect, however, relies on really understanding how people use the platform and what works for them. With many users engaging in conversations to meet new partners, its important technology doesn’t get in the way and ‘kill the mood’, with an unstable or over-censored chat platform.

Content moderation can help strike the right balance. As well as blocking the most objectionable – or illegal – content, it delivers insight that enables dating sites to encourage sincere, positive behaviours. Online dating is a space of rapid innovation and as brands create new ways to help people connect more effectively, platforms need to ensure interactions remain safe, with custom moderation approaches.

Ultimately, stopping deceitful users from harming the user experience and removing unwanted content to keep people safe will protect brand reputations. With content moderation, your dating site can become the brand you want it to be.  

Find out more about working with us and request a demo today.

edmond vassallo

By Edmond Vassallo

Head of Customer Success

This is Besedo

Global, full-service leader in content moderation

We provide automated and manual moderation for online marketplaces, online dating, sharing economy, gaming, communities and social media.
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Why creating sustainable growth means looking beyond the digital present

Over the past decade, it has become common to suggest that every company is now a tech company.

The exponential growth in digital usage quickly outgrew what we traditionally think of as the technology sector and, for users, the agility of the internet didn’t stay confined to the online world. Technology has shifted expectations about how everything can or should work. Soon, companies selling everything from furniture to financial services started to look and act more like innovative tech companies. They find new ways to solve old problems through digital channels.

In other words, business leaders seeking to guarantee growth turned to digital technology – to the point that, now, the Chief Technology Officer is a key part of the C-suite.

After a year when we’ve all relied on the internet more than ever, in every aspect of our lives, growth through digital has never been more apparent. For business, digital communication has at times been the only possible way of staying in touch with customers, and there’s no sign that the CEO’s focus on agility and technology is fading. In recent surveys, IBM found that 56% of CEOs are ‘aggressively pursuing operational agility and flexibility’, PwC found that they see cyber threats as the second biggest risk to business, and Deloitte found that 85% think the pandemic accelerated digital transformation.

If the exponential growth of digital has made every company a technology company, though, it has also made terms like ‘technology’ and ‘agility’ less useful. If every CEO is pursuing a digital strategy, that term must be encompassing a vast range of different ideas. As we look towards the next decade of growth – focused on managing the challenge of achieving more responsible and sustainable business along the way – we will need to think carefully about what comes next once digitalisation is universal.

Supercharged tech growth has skyrocketed user-generated content

Of course, the importance of agile technology has never been the tech itself, but what people do with it. For customers we’ve seen tech innovation create new ways of talking, direct access to brands, and large changes in how we consume media and make purchases.

As digital channels take on a greater share of activity than ever, one of the effects of an exponential growth in digital is an exponential growth in user-generated content (UGC).

This user-led interaction, from product reviews to marketplace listings to social interactions, fully embodies the agility that companies have spent the last decade trying to bring to their processes; because it is made by people, UGC is rapid, diverse, and flexible by default. While it may be too soon to say that every business will become a content business, it’s clear that this will become an increasingly important part of how businesses operate. Certainly, it’s already a major driving force for sectors as diverse as marketplaces, gaming, and dating.

A UGC business must be protected to maximise opportunity

In the move towards UGC, a business’s user interaction and user experience will have consequences across the organisation – from profit margin, to brand positioning, to reputational risk, to technological infrastructure. Across all of these, there will be a need to uphold users’ trust that content is being employed responsibly, that they are being protected from malign actors, and that their input is being used for their benefit. Turning content into sustainable growth, then, is a task that needs to be addressed across the company, not confined to any one business function.

Marketers, for instance, have benefited from digitalisation’s capacity to make the customer experience richer and more useful – but it has also introduced an element of unpredictability in user interactions. When communities are managed and shaped, marketers need to ensure that those efforts produce a public face in line with the company’s ethos and objectives.

While tech teams need to enable richer user interaction, their rapid ascent to become a core business function has left them under pressure to everything, everywhere. Their innovation in how content is managed, therefore, needs a middle path between the unsustainable workload of in-house development and the unsustainable compromises of off-the-shelf tooling.

With the ultimate outcomes of building user trust being measured in terms of things like brand loyalty and lifetime user value, finance departments will also need to adapt to this form of customer relationship. The creation of long-term financial health needs investments and partnerships which truly understand how the relationship between businesses and customers is changing.

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UGC as a vital asset for sustainable business growth

Bringing this all together will be the task needed to create sustainable growth – growth which is fit for and competitive in the emerging context of UGC, sensitive to the increasing caution that users will have around trusting businesses, and transparent about the organisations ethos, purpose, and direction. It will require not just investing in technology, but understanding how tech is leading us to a more interactive economy at every scale.

As digitalisation continues to widen and deepen, we may find UGC, and the trust it requires, becoming just as vital an asset for businesses as product stock or intellectual property. To prepare for that future and maximise their business growth from their UGC, businesses need to start thinking and planning today.

By Petter Nylander

CEO Besedo Global Services

This is Besedo

Global, full-service leader in content moderation

We provide automated and manual moderation for online marketplaces, online dating, sharing economy, gaming, communities and social media.

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Having quality tools is key to performing well. That’s true for content moderation as well. An outdated or feature incomplete platform affects everyone from CEO to content moderator. And the consequences can be dire ranging from lacking user and operational insights to decreased productivity or even the inability to perform important tasks.

If you are looking for your first content moderation tool or considering exchanging your in-house platform it’s a good idea to take a step back and consider the options available. It might be tempting to hand the task and your specifications to your dev team and await delivery. On the other hand, it might be better to buy an off the shelves solution that’s plug and play. In short should you build or buy?

The answer is of course very dependent on your situation, your company and your current requirements. We’ve created a list of questions that you should ask yourself and an overview of pros and cons to help you take a more informed decision.

  1. Is content moderation business defining or business critical?
  2. What are the time constraints for implementing a moderation solution?
  3. What developer resources do you have available?
  4. What is your budget?

Is content moderation business defining or business critical?

10 years ago, most online platforms didn’t prioritize content moderation as there was a lot less understanding othe negative impact from bad content. Today, most agree that content moderation is business critical to ensure user trust and ensure conversion. However, business critical isn’t the same as business defining.

For most customer facing businesses, a help-desk tool is critical, but unless customer support and how it’s delivered is a core part of your USP the software you use for customer queries doesn’t have to be unique to your business.

What you do want though, is a platform that is stable, has all required features and is updated regularly as requirement shift.

What are the time constraints for implementing a new moderation solution?

What is the timeline for implementing your new solution? Building a moderation platform from scratch can be a year-long project depending on how many developers you can throw at the task.

At the other side of the coin, even out of the box solutions usually require some level of integration with your current systems. It’s good to get an idea of requirements early in the decision process so you understand the timeline for either option. If you do decide to buy, shop around a bit to understand the difference between vendors and how much effort they will put into supporting you during the integration step.

What developer resources do you have available?

Before committing to building or buying you should figure out what developer resources you realistically have at your disposal. Keep in mind that content moderation tools are an almost living entity that needs to develop with your product and ongoing trends.

When you evaluate your developer need for an in-house solution, remember to include ongoing maintenance and new feature development.

For bought solutions you should as mentioned before do a discovery call with potential vendors to understand how much time integration will take.

What is your budget?

Budget is always an important aspect when deciding whether to build or buy. It can be really hard to estimate the cost for a content moderation solution regardless of whether you build and buy. Many vendors will have on-boarding fees, monthly fee and price/item which can make obscure to predict the actual monthly bill.

For in-house projects on the other hand, it’s easy to forget the cost of management, salaries, project meetings, and ongoing management and feature updates.

Most importantly many companies forget to keep opportunity cost in mind. What unique features could our developers have created for our core product instead of building a moderation platform?

Whether you decide to build or buy, spend some time investigating potentially hidden costs to avoid unpleasant surprises.

If you buy, go with a partner that is transparent and straight forward.

If you build, map out every cost, not just direct developer costs, but also adjacent expenditures, especially after the project has been delivered.

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Building a Content Moderation Platform:

Buying a Content Moderation Platform:

The decision to buy or build is never easy and very dependent on the business and the use cases. In most cases, asking yourself whether building an in-house solution will give you a competitive edge or if the needs can be sufficiently covered by an already existing content moderation platform.

If you want to better understand your options, feel free to reach out to us and get a transparent offer for a tailored content moderation solution.

Or check out Kaidees experience with our content moderation tools.

This is Besedo

Global, full-service leader in content moderation

We provide automated and manual moderation for online marketplaces, online dating, sharing economy, gaming, communities and social media.

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Most online platforms would agree that Images are one of the absolute most important elements of a user profile. When it comes to building trust between strangers, having an actual picture of the person you are about to engage with is vital. Whether you are looking for a date, booking a ride or renting a holiday home interacting with a total stranger can be daunting. In the real world visual clues like facial expression and body language is intuitively used to decode intent. In the digital world we must emulate these trust markers and images are a crucial part of this.

There’s one problem though. While good images can put a face on a stranger and boost user trust, bad images can have the exact opposite effect. This is one of the reasons we advocate for image quality and why we’re continuously expanding on Implios capabilities for catching and managing bad, inappropriate or low-quality images.

The latest tool in Implios image moderation toolbox is a misoriented AI module.

Why should you care about misoriented images?

The use case is straight forward of course, misoriented images (E.g. Wrongly rotated or upside down) will be caught by the model and sent for manual moderation.
Catching misoriented images is important for the overall impression of your site. A bunch of upside-down faces will make browsing time-consuming and confusing at best or make your platform look unprofessional and scammy at worst.
As more users access and create their profiles using mobile phones the number of images that are misoriented increase and the need to efficiently deal with the issue grows accordingly.

Which is why we’re excited to announce that Implio can now help you automatically identify misoriented images.

How to automatically detect misoriented images

The misoriented module will be available to all Implio users off the shelf soon. For now to gain access, just reach out to us and we’ll activate it for you. When the module is active all images will be scanned by the AI and tagged with misoriented if they are rotated wrongly.

This tag can then be utilized in Implios powerful rule creator where you can decide to send to manual moderation, reject outright (not recommended) or take no action if you want to use the rule for tracking purposes only.

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Here’s an example of an image caught by the new misoriented module. As you can see the picture is upside down and it’s been tagged by the AI with “face” and “misoriented”

rule match for misoriented images

To the right you can see that it has matched the misoriented rule.

If you decide to send misoriented images to the manual queue moderators will be able to fix the issue. Here’s a view of Implios image editing tool. Here you can crop and rotate images as you see fit.

rule match for misoriented images

This version of the misoriented image model works best with human subjects, but we’re hard at work expanding on it and soon we’ll add capabilities that will allow the model to tag items with the same level of accuracy.

If you’re looking for a way to optimize the way you handle misoriented images on your site or platform then get in touch. We can help you with the setup and have a look at your site for other low hanging content quality issues that can easily be resolved with a good moderation setup.

This is Besedo

Global, full-service leader in content moderation

We provide automated and manual moderation for online marketplaces, online dating, sharing economy, gaming, communities and social media.

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Is your site suffering from ‘marketplace leakage’? If so it’s because your customers are sharing their personal details with each other – to avoid paying site fees. But by doing so they also put themselves at risk. Here’s how to make sure your business protects itself from marketplace leakage and those that use it.

Marketplace leakage (also referred to as ‘breakage’) is a real problem for many online businesses. According to Venture Capitalists, Samaipata, the term can be defined as ‘what happens when a buyer and seller agree to circumvent the marketplace and continue transacting outside the platform.’

Broadly speaking, there are several ways in which personal details are shared – via listings, embedded in images, and within one-to-one chats. Information shared typically includes phone numbers, email addresses, WhatsApp details, and money transfer account details.

From a user perspective, it might make sense to try and do so. However, many don’t realize the wider ramifications of marketplace leakage and the negative impact it can have on the platforms they transact on – and on their own businesses.

Let’s look more closely at the impact of sharing personal details online via marketplaces and what can be done to prevent it.

How personal details do damage

As we see it, there are 3 key ways in which sharing personal details can have a negative impact.

1. Conversions

From eBay to Airbnb; Amazon to Fiverr – the vast majority of marketplaces facilitate the trade of goods and services. As a result, a core part of each platform is its payment infrastructure.

But not only do these solutions offer a trusted way for users to transact, they can also be used to collect fees – a percentage paid for using the platform.

In the early days of a platform’s existence, many sites may be available to both buyers and sellers for free – whilst the marketplace is trying to scale and get as many users as possible. However, once it’s reached a certain threshold and networks effects are visible, it’s common for them to begin charging, often through the transaction.

This is often when users – primarily those selling on these sites – will try to circumvent the platform and include their contact details in each post. It might be that they paste their email address in the product description itself, or create an image that has details included within it.

When this occurs, your marketplace loses out on conversions. It’s something that’s easy to overlook and – on the odd occasion – let slide. But in the long-term, activities like this will seriously dent your revenue generation.

2. Retention

One of the major differentiating factors between online marketplaces is whether they’re commoditized or non-commoditized – particularly where service-focused platforms are concerned.

While commoditized service providers are more about getting something specific fixed, delivered, or completed (think Uber or TaskRabbit); non-commoditized providers (eg Airbnb) take into account a number of determining factors – such as location, quality, and available amenities.

Due to the nature of these sorts of services, they are more likely to encourage personal interactions – particularly when repeat transactions with the same vendor are involved. Once trust and reliability are established, there’s little incentive for either party to remain loyal to the platform – meaning conversions are more likely to be forfeited.

Leakage of this nature was partly to blame for the demise of Homejoy – an on-demand home services recruitment platform. The nature of the work involved increased the likelihood of recurring transactions. However, it transpired that the features facilitated by the site – in-person contact, location proximity, and reliable workmanship – were of greater value than the incentives offered by using the site itself in many cases.

As a result, more and more transactions began happening outside of the marketplace; meaning that the site lost out on recurring revenues.

3. User safety

Losing control of the conversation and having users operate outside of your marketplace, increases the risk of them being scammed.

This is particularly prevalent in online dating, where even experienced site users can be duped into providing their personal details to another ‘lonely heart’ in order to take the conversation in a ‘different direction’.

eHarmony offers some great advice on what users should be wary of, but the general rule of thumb is to never disclose personal details of any kind until a significant level of trust between users has been established.

While similar rules apply to online marketplace users too, some telltale signs of a scammer are requests for alternative payment methods – such as bank or money transfers, or even checks.

An urgency to trade outside of the marketplace itself is also a sign to be aware of. So it’s important to advise your users to be cautious of traders that share their personal details. Also, make a point of telling them to be wary of vendors who are ‘unable’ to speak directly to them – those who request funds before any arrangements have been made.

In all cases, marketplaces that don’t monitor and prevent this kind of activity put their customers at risk. And if their transaction is taken away from your site, they forfeit the protection and assurances your online marketplace provides.

But unless your users understand the value and security of your platform, they’ll continue to pursue conversations off your site and expose themselves to potential scammers.

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Preventing marketplace leakage

The best way to overcome these issues and prevent marketplace leakage is to do all you can as a marketplace owner to keep buyer-seller conversations on your site and reinforce why it’s in their (and to some extent your) interest not to share personal details and remain on your platform.

There are several ways to do this.

Stronger communication

The stronger the communication channels are within your platform, the less incentive there is for customers to navigate away from your site.

From eBay and Airbnb’s messaging functionality (which look and feel like email servers) to one-to-one chat platforms (similar to Facebook Messenger or WhatsApp), or even on-site reviews and ratings; the more user-friendly and transparent you make conversations between different parties, the greater the likelihood they’ll remain on your site. A point we also highlighted and covered in our webinar about trust building through UX design.

In addition, it’s always worth reinforcing exactly what your marketplace offers users – and reminding them of their place within it. For example, telling them they’re helping build a trust-based peer-to-peer network is a powerful message – one that speaks to each user’s role as part of a like-minded online community.

Provide added value services

If users feel as though there’s no real value to using your site – other than to generate leads or make an occasional purchase – there’s very little chance that you’ll establish any meaningful connection.

The best way to foster user loyalty is to make the experience of using your marketplace a better experience to the alternative. In short, you need to give them a reason to remain on your site.

In addition to safety and security measurements – consider incentives, benefits, and loyalty programs for both vendors and buyers.

Turo, the peer-to-peer car rental site is an example of a company that does this very well – by offering insurance to lenders and travelers: both a perk and a security feature.

In a similar way, eBay’s money-back guarantee and Shieldpay’s ‘escrow’ payment service – which ensures all credible parties get paid; regardless of whether they’re buying or selling – demonstrate marketplaces acting in both customers and their own interests.

Another way in which marketplaces offer better value is through the inclusion of back-end tools, which can help vendors optimize their sales. Consider OpenTable’s booking solution for example. The restaurant reservation platform doesn’t just record bookings and show instant availability; it also helps its customer fill empty seats during quieter services.

Platforms that can see past their initial purpose and focus on their customers’ needs are those that thrive. They offer a holistic, integrated solution that addresses a wider range of pain points. Which is a great way of ensuring they’ll remain loyal to your business; ultimately reducing leakage.

Filter and remove personal details

A relatively straightforward way to prevent marketplace leakages is to monitor and remove any personal details that are posted on your site.

However, this can turn out to become quite the task, especially when the amount of user-generated content increases.

The next logical step here would be to direct efforts towards improving your content moderation. Either improve your manual moderation and expand your team or look at setting up an automated moderation solution.

An automated filter is a great solution to help prevent personal details to be shared, and although the filter creation process can be complex, it’s definitely possible to create highly accurate filters to automatically detect and remove personal details in moderation tools like Implio.

Machine learning AI is another great automated moderation solution that will help with preventing personal details, and much more. Built on your platform-specific data, a tailored AI moderation setup is developed to meet your marketplace’s unique needs. This solution is a great option for online marketplaces that look for a complete customized solution.

Added value and moderation – a mutual benefit

Trust, security, and accountability are the most valuable features that any marketplace or classified sites can offer its users. However, they’re not always the most visible components.

But when they’re parts of a broader benefit – such as optimized user experience or a suite of useful features – the need to share personal details and transact way from a site is mitigated.

That said, shared personal details will always contribute to marketplace leakage. And without the right monitoring and moderation processes in place, it’s impossible for marketplace owners to overcome the challenge of marketplace leakage.

At Besedo, we work with online marketplace and classified sites to help them make the right choices when it comes to safeguarding their businesses and users by removing personal details.

To learn more about how you can prevent personal details form your marketplace, specifically through automated filters, check out our on-demand Filter Creation Masterclass.

This is Besedo

Global, full-service leader in content moderation

We provide automated and manual moderation for online marketplaces, online dating, sharing economy, gaming, communities and social media.

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